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REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective

Posted by lloydstanbury 
REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 02, 2015 02:07PM
“Reggae music has expanded widely around the world, more so than any other music form originating from a small developing country. Marketing Reggae music in this very culturally diverse global space requires a level of sophistication that to date has not been acknowledged or applied from within Jamaica. Jamaica continues to operate without a clearly defined national cultural industry policy that provides for structured development of its music industry, including marketing strategies at both the domestic and international levels.” - REGGAE ROADBLOCKS - © 2015 Lloyd Stanbury
Log on to www.lloydstanbury.com for further details on how to get this book.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 02, 2015 02:09PM
Sounds good.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 02, 2015 09:03PM
Lloyd's book is a much needed perspective of the reggae music industry. Some chapters target some very controversial topics. I am grateful to have worked with Lloyd on a few projects that allowed me to get a clear understanding of the depth of his knowledge especially as he gathered material for the book.. Last spring, I helped him interview Copeland Forbes, Billy Mystic, Prof I, Chronixx and Roger Williams, Director of the School of Music at Edna Manley School for the Visual and Performing Arts. Listening to their perspectives and their interactions with Lloyd only deepened my respect and knowledge for what needs to be documented. I also contributed photos for the book.


I would add a photo here but I have completely forgotten how....(do I have to post it on a photo sharing website and collect the url?) Which one is best to use?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/02/2015 09:06PM by Sista Irie.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 02, 2015 10:43PM
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 03, 2015 03:33PM
Looks like something I would like to check
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 03, 2015 04:53PM
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 03, 2015 09:56PM
so chronixx says 'take me home a east', yet lloyd says 'petition the west'

whats more, chronnix says 'burn down captialism', yet lloyd leans on free market, captialist structures to firm up the reggae 'business'

a house divided ...
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 03, 2015 10:10PM
Not at all.

Love that reggae!
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 05, 2015 10:45PM
Bigvein, would you be so kind as to indicate for the benefit of readers where I presented my petition to the west? Sure hope you might take the time to read the book.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 06, 2015 05:44AM
Quote
lloydstanbury
Bigvein, would you be so kind as to indicate for the benefit of readers where I presented my petition to the west? Sure hope you might take the time to read the book.

First off, my post wasnt a comment on you. My post was meant to highlight the irony in the whole reggae/rasta scene. Specifically your artiste, Chronixx, pleads for the west to return him and his 'idren' back to Africa. The East. Then in a next tune, Chronnix is rebuking the free market and/or capitalism. All the while he hires a manager whose business affiliations are primarily with western entities. Let's not forget Chronnix collects a nice royalty check, all setup through your services. Yet again Chronnix is taking full advantage of western capitalist structures. I don't grudge his success not at all. I am the first to promote every man should get his rightful pay. But lets stop with the west bashing and constant begging of the west to 'free up' the captcha land. And what would happen if the land was free up? Nothing but go to desolation unless the west comes in and develops and maintains infrastructure.
Shaka Zulu's pickney had a chance to right the course of things when Marcus Garvey called for a return to home.
Yet Mr Garvery's own people sold him out for food and some pum. And now that ship has sailed. No pun. I think it's easier to sit begging and complaining the west for thing, instead of re-establishing home. Marcus Garvey recognized the current state of things was that he was part of a conquered people. But he recognized the temporary state, and knew that a re-grouping back home would cause the mighty race to rise again. However, the crabs won that battle and would rather a daddy figure to look up to. A daddy figure to cry and moan to. Instead of raising to the level of the ancient ancestors.

So instead of dignity and honor as seen below


We now have.. Marcus Garvey didnt die for this...

Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 06, 2015 12:36PM
Greetings Bigvein:

As said in my previous response, I hope you will take the time to read the book. Let me also correct some things for you. Chronixx is not "MY" artist. I do not own him. I am not his manager either. I provide legal services to him. There is a difference between an artist manager and an entertainment attorney providing legal services. Again, maybe you need to read the book. You may learn something more about my perspective on Reggae, Rastafari, Jamaica and Africa.

For the benefit of the readers you would do good to list the entities in the west with whom I have business affiliations. I am an individual acting as a consultant in my own business. I do not work for a company, nor am I partner with any entity.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/06/2015 12:47PM by lloydstanbury.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 06, 2015 05:45PM
Let me be perfectly clear, I have no contention with you. My initial post was just to illustrate how artists dont even understand what they are saying in their songs.. Its fashionable to beg the west to 'return' this and that. Or its fashionable to burn out free market systems. Yet while these same artists are penning the next 'fiya pon capitalists' tune, they are cashing publishing/royalty checks made possible by the same system they scorn.. Don't get me wrong, I love the west indian people, the jamaican people with a passion. In fact I have traced my father's family history back to trewlany jamaica.. Of course I can only go back to 1700s slave records, but thats where my father's side origins from. Bell/Beverly is the family name. I digress. My point is Marcus Garvey had it right. Stand up, don't beg a nation to do right. Stand firm, do right amongst yourselves, and others will follow. Thats why Marcus Garvey first established a standard. A standard of honor, integrity, and upful living. From that standard a nation can build and then compete within the world stage. Unity. Marcus never paraded around symbols of slavery. He never celebrated being a conquered race. What he promoted was a return to the ancient ways of livity. Of being a magnificent people. Of being a people who must be dealt with accordingly. Slavery to Marcus was not his heritage. His heritage was kingly in nature. Fast forward today, and the only images we see are those of slaves, or of the slave period. Why celebrate being conquered? Why celebrate the lowest point a nation? Why celebrate always looking up at 'massa' for a thing. Marcus Garvey never ever stood for that. He said 'up ye mighty race!!' But as I said, that ship has sailed. Its like
the thing is stuck. No one really wants to work. No one really wants to hold a standard. Its all about weed, pum, and bling. Throw in some anti-west, morgan the pirate references and you have the perfect reggae song.


To your question... Your site lists all of the below. All western bodies who happen to have some African members. These are not African organizations. These are organizations that ALLOW Africans to participate. And this is why I say you have to petition the west to hear your cause.

"His consultancy services include research, project development and management, workshop and seminar presentations to and on behalf of entities, such as the Government of Jamaica; the Caribbean Common Market (CARICOM) Secretariat; the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery (CRNM); the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD); the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO); the Organization of American States (OAS); the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), and Culture et Development from Grenoble, France. "


Quote
lloydstanbury
Greetings Bigvein:

As said in my previous response, I hope you will take the time to read the book. Let me also correct some things for you. Chronixx is not "MY" artist. I do not own him. I am not his manager either. I provide legal services to him. There is a difference between an artist manager and an entertainment attorney providing legal services. Again, maybe you need to read the book. You may learn something more about my perspective on Reggae, Rastafari, Jamaica and Africa.

For the benefit of the readers you would do good to list the entities in the west with whom I have business affiliations. I am an individual acting as a consultant in my own business. I do not work for a company, nor am I partner with any entity.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 06, 2015 07:54PM
Bigvein if you have no contention with me then maybe the points you raise should not be in this thread. This is a thread initiated by me to invite interested parties to read my book. I will say it again in the hope that you might give it some consideration. Try to read the book. A lot of the issues you have expressed your opinion on are discussed.

I do think that you should also consider taking your issues up with Chronixx and other artists directly, as they are quite competent to speak for themselves.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/06/2015 10:39PM by lloydstanbury.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 07, 2015 12:09AM
I am looking forward to the book Lloyd. Seems the reggae industry has never been able to get its act together. I'd be curious why US based reggae bands (JBB, Groundation..etc) are able to succeed on a grassroots level, while JA acts can't. Is it a matter of being in the US and the issue of visas? Do the US bands have a better "business model?"
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 07, 2015 09:42PM
Give thanks for the book and your efforts!

Love that reggae!
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 07, 2015 11:05PM
For those that are involved in the (California) Reggae concert scene – are the Cali Roots bands really pulling crowds away from seeing Jamaican artists?

Or is the Cali Roots crowd made up of people that are mainly interested in seeing Cali Roots style Reggae?

And a question to you specifically Lloyd, are Jamaican musicians keenly aware of the Cali Roots situation, to the point that they are altering their music (or anything else) to attract more attention from a Cali Roots crowd?

Strange how things change with time, 25 years ago, most people I knew would have cringed if they heard that the band we were going to see wasn't an 'all Jamaican band' --- and now when I tell them about the Cali Roots thing, they pretty much think I'm making it up spinning smiley sticking its tongue out
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 08, 2015 01:59AM
Quote
reggaefan
For those that are involved in the (California) Reggae concert scene – are the Cali Roots bands really pulling crowds away from seeing Jamaican artists?

Or is the Cali Roots crowd made up of people that are mainly interested in seeing Cali Roots style Reggae?

And a question to you specifically Lloyd, are Jamaican musicians keenly aware of the Cali Roots situation, to the point that they are altering their music (or anything else) to attract more attention from a Cali Roots crowd?

Strange how things change with time, 25 years ago, most people I knew would have cringed if they heard that the band we were going to see wasn't an 'all Jamaican band' --- and now when I tell them about the Cali Roots thing, they pretty much think I'm making it up spinning smiley sticking its tongue out


I still "cringe" grinning smiley
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 08, 2015 09:23PM
Quote
reggaefan
For those that are involved in the (California) Reggae concert scene – are the Cali Roots bands really pulling crowds away from seeing Jamaican artists?

Or is the Cali Roots crowd made up of people that are mainly interested in seeing Cali Roots style Reggae?

And a question to you specifically Lloyd, are Jamaican musicians keenly aware of the Cali Roots situation, to the point that they are altering their music (or anything else) to attract more attention from a Cali Roots crowd?

Strange how things change with time, 25 years ago, most people I knew would have cringed if they heard that the band we were going to see wasn't an 'all Jamaican band' --- and now when I tell them about the Cali Roots thing, they pretty much think I'm making it up spinning smiley sticking its tongue out

When Ziggy has to open the show for Rebelution, Steel Pulse opens for SOJA and Sly & Robbie open for Slightly Stoopid, it's pretty clear where the demographics are these days. It seems that the Cali Roots crowd isn't looking for their music to be 'authentic', but something to which they can relate. There seems to be a certain xenophobia in our society in recent years that leads music fans to seek the familiar in speech, dress and attitude, in contrast to the earlier days of reggae where the exotic aspects of Jamaica, Rasta, patois etc. were what attracted fans to it. This (and the fact that much of the cultural aspect of Jamaican music became dogmatic and cliched) has led to a decline in popularity of Jamaican roots reggae in California and an upsurge in lighter, more rock-based reggae with recognizably 'American' vocals and lyrics.

As far as Jamaican musicians adapting to this new paradigm, Slightly Stoopid regularly brings up Don Carlos onstage with them. I feel they're being sincere in wanting to expose their fanbase to the music that inspired them. Meanwhile, Don continues to sell out the more traditional reggae venues as well, so his exposure to the Cali Roots crowd is not hurting his draw amongst fans of Jamaican reggae. I don't really see the Jamaican artists changing their music or style to suit Cali audiences. Don certainly doesn't have any reason to do so.

25 years ago was before the advent of Sublime, the godfathers of the Cali-reggae subgenre. They appropriated (some would say stole) basslines from Jamaican reggae songs to build their own reggae tunes. Nothing wrong with that in my book; recycling bassline riddims is a Jamaican national tradition. But Sublime really made no effort to show their fanbase the Jamaican roots of their inspiration. I'm not sure if that was due to their wanting to take the credit for it all, or that they just had other priorities. I had really hoped when Sublime blew up in the mid-90s that their popularity would turn a new generation of youth on to the reggae music that I and so many others fell in love with. Instead, we only got a proliferation of CA and HI-based bands in the mold of Sublime who weren't really knowledgable about reggae, its history or its techniques (although some have become much better over time). And that's pretty much where we stand today.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 09, 2015 05:22PM
to be fair, the 'californication' of jamaican music really started with 80s ska bands..

fishbone
the untouchables
bosstones
etc

i remember first hearing 'no doubt' when i was in college.. everyone was carrying on and on about the new sound..
but that sound was really a gumbo mixture of that whole 80s so cal music scene.

missing persons
suicidals
black flag
various so-cal ska bands
etc etc




Quote
Stamina!
Quote
reggaefan
For those that are involved in the (California) Reggae concert scene – are the Cali Roots bands really pulling crowds away from seeing Jamaican artists?

Or is the Cali Roots crowd made up of people that are mainly interested in seeing Cali Roots style Reggae?

And a question to you specifically Lloyd, are Jamaican musicians keenly aware of the Cali Roots situation, to the point that they are altering their music (or anything else) to attract more attention from a Cali Roots crowd?

Strange how things change with time, 25 years ago, most people I knew would have cringed if they heard that the band we were going to see wasn't an 'all Jamaican band' --- and now when I tell them about the Cali Roots thing, they pretty much think I'm making it up spinning smiley sticking its tongue out

When Ziggy has to open the show for Rebelution, Steel Pulse opens for SOJA and Sly & Robbie open for Slightly Stoopid, it's pretty clear where the demographics are these days. It seems that the Cali Roots crowd isn't looking for their music to be 'authentic', but something to which they can relate. There seems to be a certain xenophobia in our society in recent years that leads music fans to seek the familiar in speech, dress and attitude, in contrast to the earlier days of reggae where the exotic aspects of Jamaica, Rasta, patois etc. were what attracted fans to it. This (and the fact that much of the cultural aspect of Jamaican music became dogmatic and cliched) has led to a decline in popularity of Jamaican roots reggae in California and an upsurge in lighter, more rock-based reggae with recognizably 'American' vocals and lyrics.

As far as Jamaican musicians adapting to this new paradigm, Slightly Stoopid regularly brings up Don Carlos onstage with them. I feel they're being sincere in wanting to expose their fanbase to the music that inspired them. Meanwhile, Don continues to sell out the more traditional reggae venues as well, so his exposure to the Cali Roots crowd is not hurting his draw amongst fans of Jamaican reggae. I don't really see the Jamaican artists changing their music or style to suit Cali audiences. Don certainly doesn't have any reason to do so.

25 years ago was before the advent of Sublime, the godfathers of the Cali-reggae subgenre. They appropriated (some would say stole) basslines from Jamaican reggae songs to build their own reggae tunes. Nothing wrong with that in my book; recycling bassline riddims is a Jamaican national tradition. But Sublime really made no effort to show their fanbase the Jamaican roots of their inspiration. I'm not sure if that was due to their wanting to take the credit for it all, or that they just had other priorities. I had really hoped when Sublime blew up in the mid-90s that their popularity would turn a new generation of youth on to the reggae music that I and so many others fell in love with. Instead, we only got a proliferation of CA and HI-based bands in the mold of Sublime who weren't really knowledgable about reggae, its history or its techniques (although some have become much better over time). And that's pretty much where we stand today.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 09, 2015 05:39PM
Very true bigvein...I dunno about the Bosstones who were from the E coast, but I remember opening in SoCal in the mid-90s for a socalled "third wave ska" band, Reel Big Fish, who led the crowd in a rousing chant of what was apparently their motto, "YOU SUCK @$$HOLE!" There was very little I could call 'ska' in their music, besides sometimes using a frenetic upbeat about 3X the speed of the original Jamaican ska. All that, as you so succinctly put it, "californication" was indeed already taking place down there with ska, which Sublime simply took to the next level with reggae. To this day I still confuse Fishbone and Badfish.

Quote
bigvein
to be fair, the 'californication' of jamaican music really started with 80s ska bands..

fishbone
the untouchables
bosstones
etc

i remember first hearing 'no doubt' when i was in college.. everyone was carrying on and on about the new sound..
but that sound was really a gumbo mixture of that whole 80s so cal music scene.

missing persons
suicidals
black flag
various so-cal ska bands
etc etc




Quote
Stamina!
Quote
reggaefan
For those that are involved in the (California) Reggae concert scene – are the Cali Roots bands really pulling crowds away from seeing Jamaican artists?

Or is the Cali Roots crowd made up of people that are mainly interested in seeing Cali Roots style Reggae?

And a question to you specifically Lloyd, are Jamaican musicians keenly aware of the Cali Roots situation, to the point that they are altering their music (or anything else) to attract more attention from a Cali Roots crowd?

Strange how things change with time, 25 years ago, most people I knew would have cringed if they heard that the band we were going to see wasn't an 'all Jamaican band' --- and now when I tell them about the Cali Roots thing, they pretty much think I'm making it up spinning smiley sticking its tongue out

When Ziggy has to open the show for Rebelution, Steel Pulse opens for SOJA and Sly & Robbie open for Slightly Stoopid, it's pretty clear where the demographics are these days. It seems that the Cali Roots crowd isn't looking for their music to be 'authentic', but something to which they can relate. There seems to be a certain xenophobia in our society in recent years that leads music fans to seek the familiar in speech, dress and attitude, in contrast to the earlier days of reggae where the exotic aspects of Jamaica, Rasta, patois etc. were what attracted fans to it. This (and the fact that much of the cultural aspect of Jamaican music became dogmatic and cliched) has led to a decline in popularity of Jamaican roots reggae in California and an upsurge in lighter, more rock-based reggae with recognizably 'American' vocals and lyrics.

As far as Jamaican musicians adapting to this new paradigm, Slightly Stoopid regularly brings up Don Carlos onstage with them. I feel they're being sincere in wanting to expose their fanbase to the music that inspired them. Meanwhile, Don continues to sell out the more traditional reggae venues as well, so his exposure to the Cali Roots crowd is not hurting his draw amongst fans of Jamaican reggae. I don't really see the Jamaican artists changing their music or style to suit Cali audiences. Don certainly doesn't have any reason to do so.

25 years ago was before the advent of Sublime, the godfathers of the Cali-reggae subgenre. They appropriated (some would say stole) basslines from Jamaican reggae songs to build their own reggae tunes. Nothing wrong with that in my book; recycling bassline riddims is a Jamaican national tradition. But Sublime really made no effort to show their fanbase the Jamaican roots of their inspiration. I'm not sure if that was due to their wanting to take the credit for it all, or that they just had other priorities. I had really hoped when Sublime blew up in the mid-90s that their popularity would turn a new generation of youth on to the reggae music that I and so many others fell in love with. Instead, we only got a proliferation of CA and HI-based bands in the mold of Sublime who weren't really knowledgable about reggae, its history or its techniques (although some have become much better over time). And that's pretty much where we stand today.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 09, 2015 06:00PM
Jamaican music has always had international appeal. Prior to the "Californication" of Jamaican music, to borrow an expression from Bigvein, recording artists from the UK such as The Police and The Clash experimented with the Jamaican sound and broke big in their homeland. There are a number of factors that have prevented Jamaican artists, with the exception of a few, from achieving the same degree of success in the UK and California/USA markets. In my opinion the artists, managers, and marketers coming out of Jamaica have not taken the time to properly analyze the situation we speak of in this thread. They have therefore not been able to apply appropriate measures to benefit from the new audience introduced to the music. A greater level of collaboration and information flow is required between Jamaicans and Reggae aficionados in these overseas markets to create the environment necessary for growth and increased levels of success. First and foremost in my view, is the need for Jamaicans to become more professional in their approach to music.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/09/2015 06:57PM by lloydstanbury.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 09, 2015 08:23PM
Look forward to checking the book, congratulations!.

I wonder how the severance of thematic connections between Haile Selassie and the music, on the part of reggae fans has helped contribute to what we are seeing today? In the commentary on this thread, there is a sentiment about these "cali" bands failing to give credit to the foundation of reggae music, but maybe there is also a burden to bare on the part of the fans. Even among some fans that love the roots music, there is effort to redefine and intellectualize the persona of Haile Selassie as something different than the message within the music. Collectively, this effort to separate has happened within the music, by the fans, and on a larger scale in politics. We see the same kind of thing in global and African politics today, with the AU for example which was founded in principle by His Majesty but there is no popular acknowledgement.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 09, 2015 09:23PM
Quote
Stamina!
There seems to be a certain xenophobia in our society in recent years that leads music fans to seek the familiar in speech, dress and attitude,

I think this is a huge factor, Stamina. Now I may be wrong but I think the Cali Roots crowd enjoys seeing bands that they can connect to and maybe even converse with more easily. How many times have I heard someone say, 'hey, that band up there, those guys are tight with some of my homies' eye rolling smiley

Personally, I don't care one bit if I know or don't know one of the band members. Can you play the music properly? That's what matters to me. But we are living in some really narcissistic times, so if someone can somehow trace a band member back to something that has to do with themselves, it takes on a whole new meaning.

And for the average fan, if they can meet up with some of the band members they just saw on stage and drink beer and smoke a spliff with them, then they're really on board.

Try doing that with the vast majority of Jamaican artists, or at least that's how it used to be --- not sure how much things have changed but if you were hoping to do that, most times you were turned away or sneared at --- unless you were there with your girlfriend right next to you..... and that's a whole other story that's better left alone without an ending.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 10, 2015 04:27PM
Give thanks for all the comments so far, both positive and negative. All perspectives are welcomed and appreciated. I feel encouraged, as this is exactly the kind of conversation I was hoping the book would generate.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 10, 2015 05:32PM
Hopeful to read the book ASAP. Will be nice to discuss at SNWMF 2016. Inna conference style maybe. winking smiley

~Highest Heightz Every Time~
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 10, 2015 08:03PM
Lloyd..do you ever feel that JA stars think they are bigger than they really are? Thus leading to subpar business dealings?
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 10, 2015 08:34PM
Quote
lloydstanbury
First and foremost in my view, is the need for Jamaicans to become more professional in their approach to music.

Yes, it seems the whole 'soon come' approach to time management is a killer as well.
But let's face it. The biggest acts to ever out of Jamaica are those of very light skinned complexion.
Bob Marley, Shaggy, Sean Paul(is he even Black? Or just Jamaican born? ).. With the exception of Bob Marley, the spiritual message isnt even there from the view of the other two artists. It's just a party music. Chris Blackwell called it, take one part talented, light skinned black guy.. mix another part some pop music influence, and sprinkle in some professional management.. shake, bake and you have a hit making brand.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 10, 2015 08:50PM
speaking of chris blackwell, he may be a good resource to tap as well.. he was able to take a relatively unheard-of music and push it worldwide.. its proably also telling why he no longer deals with reggae acts.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 10, 2015 08:56PM
Quote

The biggest acts to ever out of Jamaica are those of very light skinned complexion.

Peter Tosh and Burning Spear are 2 'big' artists neither of whom are melanin challenged nor did they compromise their message or musical styles in order to appeal to the masses....
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 10, 2015 09:17PM
peter tosh is more of a mythical figure, not really someone you can rate as a 'big artist'.. at least not in terms of record sales. i could walk into any public establishment and someone could identify bob marley, sean paul and shaggy.. peter tosh not so much. he just doesnt have that much appeal outside of west indian cultures or alternative music sub-cultures. he is like syd vicious.. people will wear the shirt or put on the sticker.. all to surround themselves with symbols of 'rebellion'. however ask those same people to run off a peter tosh tune.. crickets.. regarding 'selling out' i would say the tosh/jagger make out session on SNL was a huge compromise. so yeah, he didnt change the message of his lyrics, but he(tosh) let jaggar molest him in the grossest of ways.. jaggar basically told the world 'this is my boy and he dances to my tune.. lick lick'

as for spear, his appeal doesnt extend farther than the grateful dead type crowd. does he even have a platinum or diamond record? i think bob, shaggy, and sean paul all can claim diamond..
but i agree, spear doesnt compromise.. i just dont see spear or any other artist on the same appeal level of my stated three..

but maybe i missing the point..

are we talking taking the music to a world wide level.. increasing the appeal of the music.. or just keeping reggae artists in constant, consistent touring rotation?
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 10, 2015 10:12PM
don't know where you grew up BV but in Chicago as a white boy in the 80's I had all the Peter Tosh, Black Uhuru and Steel Pulse records next to my Led Zeppelin, Doors and Hendrix vinyl. Legalize It is possibly the biggest reggae tune of all time. Everyone knew Bob. Tosh was the next step, but definitely popular and readily accessible with his used albums in easy full circulation. Meaning lots of copies. The Toughest is One of the greatest albums I grew up to. Have some respect for the foundation star.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 10, 2015 10:55PM
Quote
akee123
Lloyd..do you ever feel that JA stars think they are bigger than they really are? Thus leading to subpar business dealings?

Yes Akee, in my opinion many artists from Jamaica mistakenly consider themselves big international stars merely by virtue of their popularity within the Jamaican community. I have experienced many instances of over-pricing for international gigs by Jamaican artists who are hardly known outside the West Indian communities. Many Jamaican artists also surround themselves with inexperienced representatives who do not know what is required to do business at a professional level.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 11, 2015 12:22AM
Lloyd,

So another question. Why is this even a discussion ? If anything, all these road blocks should have been identfied between the late 70s and mid 80s. From that point on, Jamaica should have been treating the music like one of their prized exports. At all levels, from the players to the business people. I guess another question is, do Jamaicans really want the music to go to a next level? Or do they just want to keep it a local thing. If keeping it local is the desire then all of this talk is mental circle jurging. If the desire is to use the music as a means to enrich Jamacan lives, through international touring, etc, then whats being doing to teach professionalism? If professionalism hasnt been taught or figured out in the last 40 years, then what makes you think it will change in the 40 to come? India/Hong-Kong are former British colonies and both have figured it out in terms of global marketing and global business.. why is Jamaica, and others, still trying to figure out the basics ? Sign a contract, show up, perform as agreed to, do a little PR, get paid.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 11, 2015 03:19PM
Quote
strikkly
don't know where you grew up BV but in Chicago as a white boy in the 80's I had all the Peter Tosh, Black Uhuru and Steel Pulse records next to my Led Zeppelin, Doors and Hendrix vinyl. Legalize It is possibly the biggest reggae tune of all time. Everyone knew Bob. Tosh was the next step, but definitely popular and readily accessible with his used albums in easy full circulation. Meaning lots of copies. The Toughest is One of the greatest albums I grew up to. Have some respect for the foundation star.

strikkly,

big up the reasonings.. first off, i was born and raised in oceanside/vista ca. also, not sure if you read my posts, if so you should notice i have shared many many peter tosh songs. so personally i rate peter tosh as one of the greats. in terms of lyricism and in strength. you should also notice that many tunes i post are ones of upliftment and inspiration. i speak from the perspective of one who wants each one to realize their God given potential. i am very much beyond the point of talking and talking about whats happened in the past. if i do look to the past it is only to reference the actions of marcus garvey. a man of action, integrity, and dignity. he didnt hang his hat on the hopes that someone will do a thing for him. he recognized his God spark, and didnt waste his time in trying to help his people. yet, as with most prophets he was slain by the hand of his own people.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/11/2015 03:20PM by bigvein.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 11, 2015 07:35PM
Quote
Daniel
Quote

The biggest acts to ever out of Jamaica are those of very light skinned complexion.

Peter Tosh and Burning Spear are 2 'big' artists neither of whom are melanin challenged nor did they compromise their message or musical styles in order to appeal to the masses....

to reach global audiences you dont have to water it down..

i believe this performance was a HUGE compromise..






this next performance sends a bigger judgement.. no skin-n-grin.. no mascot business... no compromise!!!



Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 11, 2015 08:09PM
ok.. i have to rewind and dedicate the judgement to all back-shuffling, hypocrite and back biter




Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 12, 2015 08:40PM
Quote
Daniel
Quote

The biggest acts to ever out of Jamaica are those of very light skinned complexion.

Peter Tosh and Burning Spear are 2 'big' artists neither of whom are melanin challenged nor did they compromise their message or musical styles in order to appeal to the masses....

And, artists like Fred Locks, Kiddus I, Augustus Pablo, Cedric Myton of the Congos, and many others are of a lighter complexion, but have no compromise or apologies with their message...their dearth of melanin didn't factor in their relative lack of commercial success...
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 12, 2015 08:48PM
@stamina

'.... mold of Sublime'

lol.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
August 12, 2015 08:53PM
Reggae is a niche music...and that's OK. Just improve it within the niche.
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
September 01, 2015 09:52PM
A RASTAMAN'S PERSPECTIVE Prof-I
Re: REGGAE ROADBLOCKS, A Music Business Development Perspective
September 02, 2015 06:22AM
Quote
bigvein
ok.. i have to rewind and dedicate the judgement to all back-shuffling, hypocrite and back biter




LOL at Jay Leno



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/02/2015 11:47AM by AztecRasta.
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