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Jamaica gets new Prime Minister

Posted by Ras Danny 
Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
February 28, 2006 03:41PM
from yesterdays USA Today

WOMAN WINS JAMAICAN LEADERSHIP RACE

Portia Simpson-Miller is set to become Jamaica's first female prime minister after beating three opponents for leadership of the People's National party. Prime Minister P.J. Patterson, who is halfway through his third term, has said he will step down before the legislature reconvenes April 1.
Simpson-Miller is minister of local goverment, community development, and sports.
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II is head of state of the former British colony of nearly 3 million people.

by Paul Leavitt with wire reports



--
blessid love
ras danny
higher reasoning reggae time
KBOO Portland, Full Strength Community Radio
*Love is a net that catches hearts like fish.*
-Muhammad Ali
*I don't like reggae, I love it*
jb welda
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
February 28, 2006 04:41PM
>Britain's Queen Elizabeth II is head of state of the former British colony of nearly
>3 million people.

i didnt know that...anyone know what this really means? must just be a figurehead?

one love
jah bill
The man
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
February 28, 2006 04:43PM
She's just a figurehead in the UK too.

In Jamaica, they must get permission from English judges if they wish to execute anyone.

Observer
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
February 28, 2006 05:06PM
good. maybe she'll deal accordingly with this type of thing:

The gruesome murders of five members of a St Thomas family - three of them children no older than nine years old - have left people in this parish on Jamaica's southeastern coast shocked and bewildered.

The victims' family and friends are also fearful that another member of the family - Jhaid McCool, 6 - and Michael McLean, who had a relationship with one of victims, are also dead, as they cannot be found.
The murdered family members are:
. Farika Martin-McCool, 27, dry goods clerk, and her three children
. Jessie Ogilvie, 9;
. Sean Chin, 8;
. Lloyd McCool, 3; and
. Terry-Ann Mohammed, also called 'Teenie', 42, businesswoman and aunt of Farika Martin-McCool.

They all lived at 49 Duhaney Pen Road, St Thomas.
Up to last night, homicide detectives from Kingston, directed by Assistant Commissioner of Police Arthur 'Stitch' Martin, could not determine a motive for the gruesome killings. However, a high-ranking investigator, who asked not to be named, said the killings were "a highly organised job".
Police said that at about 7:00 am yesterday, fishermen on the Blue Mahoe Beach in Prospect stumbled upon the bodies of two children - Lloyd and Jessie - lying together with their throats cut.

The bodies of Martin-McCool and her son Sean were found about a half-mile away, on the other side of the beach called 'Cutters Point'. Their throats were also cut and Martin-McCool had several stab wounds in her back.
Detectives believe that Martin-McCool was running away from her attacker(s) as she was found lying on her face about 22 yards from her son's body, which was also lying face down.

At about 10:30 am, Terry-Ann Mohammed's body was found 12 miles away on the side of a footpath in Needham Pen. It was burnt beyond recognition.
Police said the body was identified by a pair of slippers she was wearing.

"This is a shocking thing to everybody," said one man in the crowd. "Is the first in my life I see anything as gruesome as this. It bad fe true. Dem de man de cruel fe true, even de little pickney throat dem cut."
Another man said: "This a Mafia killing. A so de drug man dem an de Mafia do fe dem killing. If a nuh something behind it, den a mus some sign God a send."
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
February 28, 2006 06:55PM
PNP hasn't done much to deal with that in all PJ's years, I doubt the new PM will be much different.

Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
February 28, 2006 07:13PM
[www.jamaica-gleaner.com]

SW St Andrew proud of Portia - 'We expect a lot of things...improvement and all that'.
published: Tuesday | February 28, 2006

Dionne Rose, Staff Reporter

MANY RESIDENTS of south west St. Andrew feel a sense of pride and joy that their Member of Parliament, Portia Simpson Miller, has been elected to the top post in the People's National Party (PNP).

To them, this significant and historic moment is like a rainbow - representing a promise that, finally, their impoverished communities will be physically improved and jobs provided for many.

For the outsider looking in, Sunday seemed like a normal morning in that constituency. There were no visible celebrations taking place but various groups seen hanging out on the corner, listening to blaring music, indicated that it was indeed a moment of celebration.

In Whitfield Town, one of the several communities in Kingston, which make up Mrs. Simpson Miller's constituency, residents were happy she was successful in her bid for the party presidency.

Desmond McDow is one such hopeful young man. "Good for her, just hope that it is good for us as well," he told The Gleaner when asked how he felt about her win.

"We expect a lot of things ... improvement and all that ... mi happy fi her still, but a lot is yet to be done same way," he said. "(We) want job provision and opportunity on a whole so the youth dem can get work and the community can lift up more."

WAIT-AND-SEE SITUATION

Donald Bailey, also from Whitfield Town, was happy for Mrs. Simpson Miller. But for him it is a wait-and-see situation as to whether her community will benefit from her elevation.

"Mi glad she win," he said, "We a go watch and see whe she a go do fi her constituency."

In Majesty Garden, near Three Miles, which was renamed the Portia Simpson Miller Square some years ago, many women and children also expressed their happiness.

Many of them shouted, "Sista P, we love yuh! Portia! Portia!" when the news team arrived in the community. Many of them listed the expectations they have of her.

"She have Majesty Garden pon plan right now, she a go develop the community, football field, basket ball court, is all about Sista P," said Denton Parker.

Several women in that community also expressed their joy at her win.

"We feel good, 100 per cent good," said Sonia.

"She should get it long time, as a woman she nice. She will make nuff difference better than the man dem," added another woman.

They claimed that, because she did not previously hold a good position in the party, she was unable to do more for her community.



--
blessid love
ras danny
higher reasoning reggae time
KBOO Portland, Full Strength Community Radio
*Love is a net that catches hearts like fish.*
-Muhammad Ali
*I don't like reggae, I love it*
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
February 28, 2006 07:53PM
Mob vents anger - Residents flock police station over killing of five; threaten detainee
published: Tuesday | February 28, 2006

Glenroy Sinclair, Staff Reporter

IN A scene unfamiliar to the town of Morant Bay, St. Thomas, a sea of angry residents yesterday threatened to attack the police station, demanding that the lawmen hand over a man they claimed was responsible for the deaths of the five family members, including three children, who were brutally murdered in the parish on Sunday.

The victims were identified as Patrice Martin-McCool, Sean Chin Jnr., nine, Marshall George McCool, three, nine year-old Jesse O'Gilvie and a 40-year-old woman, Terry-Ann Mohammed. They are all from Duhaney Pen in the parish.

"Him fi dead, give we him mek we kill him," shouted members of the the angry mob, whose boisterous behaviour forced the police to close the doors of the station for more than an hour.

ASKED POLICE TO COLLECT HIM

The man, who was deported a year ago from the United States, was picked up by lawmen in Harbour View, east Kingston, shortly after he had contacted the Morant Bay police. Reports are that, out of fear for his life, he asked the police to come and get him.

He is among three men being questioned in connection with the murders.

"Some contact was made between him and the police, but I think we are on top of things," said Superintendent Doric Sinclair, who took over command of the division yesterday.

While the police are yet to establish a motive for the multiple killing, preliminary investigations suggest it may have been drug-related.

"We have been hearing more than one story, but from my point of view, I believe that there is more than one factor at play here," James Robertson, Member of Parliament for West St. Thomas, told The Gleaner yesterday.

He said the people were angry and the area tense.

"I am hoping that the police get additional staff to their complement to keep everybody calm and handle the situation," he added.

Prime Minister P.J. Patterson said he was shocked and appalled at the murders and "deeply distressed that human beings would go to such horrible extremes."

"Today the country is plunged into sadness and mourning," he said. "This latest incident reminds us that we cannot be complacent in the fight against crime and violence."

The Prime Minister said he hoped those missing would be found alive and called for the community to comfort the family and assistant the police in apprehending all those responsible.

Up to yesterday evening, two children were still missing and feared dead. A spokesperson at the Morant Bay Police Station said they received several calls that bodies were "here and there", which turned out to be false.

Esther McGowan, principal of the Morant Bay Primary School, said it was an emotional scene at her school yesterday morning, as the death of Jesse O'Gilvie, who was a popular student and a member of the school's scout group, has left schoolmates traumatised.

"His best friend who sits beside him told us yesterday that he felt like killing himself," said a teary eyed Miss McGowan.

The Ministry of National Security said counsellors from its Victim Support Unit were assisting families, the community and schools affected by the murders.

Yesterday National Security Minister Dr. Peter Phillips condemned the killings and called on anyone with information to assist the police.



--
blessid love
ras danny
higher reasoning reggae time
KBOO Portland, Full Strength Community Radio
*Love is a net that catches hearts like fish.*
-Muhammad Ali
*I don't like reggae, I love it*
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
February 28, 2006 07:57PM
Jamaica Labour Party unfazed by Simpson Miller's victory
published: Tuesday | February 28, 2006

Dionne Rose, Staff Reporter

PORTIA SIMPSON Miller's victory as president of the People's National Party (PNP) and Prime Minister-designate, has not shaken the confidence of members of the Jamaica Labour Party (JLP).

The Opposition is still confident of a win in the next general election, which is constitutionally due next year. But political pundits are indicating that Mrs. Simpson Miller's ascendancy to the leadership post might just cement the PNP's fifth term in office.

"I do not see her popularity as a big problem, the whole Government has lost popularity," said Pearnel Charles, JLP Member of Parliament for north central Clarendon. "I don't know that within the next 15 to 20 months she will be able to make that difference."

Mr. Charles pointed out that there were still issues that the PNP administration needed to address such as crime and corruption.

NOT TAKING WIN LIGHTLY

Meanwhile, Shahine Robinson, shadow spokesperson on Local Government said the JLP was not worried about Simpson Miller's victory.

"Because anyone who had won, we would have to face them (in the next general elections). I doubt that there is due concern," she said.

It is however obvious that the JLP is not taking this win lightly.

When contacted yesterday, the party's information spokesman, Senator Dwight Nelson said the matter would be thoroughly discussed at the party's Standing Committee meeting, which was held last night.

Political analysts however believe the Opposition should at this moment be putting its house in order.

"The Jamaica Labour Party does have need to be worried, if their aim is to win the next election," said political analyst Professor Brian Meeks. "All the recent polls show that Portia Simpson Miller is the most popular."

Professor Meeks said there were other important issues which could have a negative impact on her standing at the next election. These include the national budget, which will be presented within weeks, the crime problem and the economy.

GOOD ELECTORAL MOVE

Lambert Brown, trade unionist and political commentator said Mrs. Simpson Miller's victory was a good electoral move made by the PNP's delegates.

"It is going to be difficult (for the JLP) to beat her but it is not insurmountable," he said.

Mr. Brown however cautioned the Opposition to be extremely careful in their political campaigning. He said if they make the mistake of portraying her as intellectually incompetent, as did the Phillips' campaign team, they would lose public ground.



--
blessid love
ras danny
higher reasoning reggae time
KBOO Portland, Full Strength Community Radio
*Love is a net that catches hearts like fish.*
-Muhammad Ali
*I don't like reggae, I love it*
papa ray
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
February 28, 2006 08:04PM
Notwithstanding a few positive/amusing encounters inna JA w/ the Police, my radar is always on high alert around dem, 'cause some are real jokers, no joke. Upon my only arrest there, many many many moons ago, at first I thought I was being held up by pimp-gunmen. Leastways, that's what they looked like @ 3AM,
in Maypen....
jb welda
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
February 28, 2006 08:47PM
ive always found that, from a yankee perspective, they just want you to supplement their meager salary and then its all cool star dont forget to take your herb sir.

one love
jah bill
Acacia
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
March 02, 2006 06:36PM
New Zealand
Sri Lanka
Argentina
Chile
Jamaica
Saint Lucia
Finland
Liberia
Canada
Mozambique
Ireland
Bangladesh
Germany
Latvia
The Phillipines

All of these countries have elected women as heads of state. More than a few of them have (from an American perspective) cultures that are traditionally more male-dominant and in some cases discriminatory towards women than the US. Will we ever elect a woman president? Why is it that countries around the world where machismo is mainstream have been able to elect women leaders and we have never really even come close? Are we still 50 years away, same as we were 50 years ago? When will we finally see it too?

jb welda
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
March 02, 2006 06:42PM
im not so sure that gender has much to do with it. look at condaleeza rice, now there is a woman of color...who also happens to be the biggest puppet we have seen in a long time.

hope that doesnt disturb anyone (using her for an example i mean).

and then there was maggie thatcher.

one love
jah bill
Acacia
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
March 02, 2006 07:05PM
Condoleeza Rice is not the president, nor has she run for president. I'm not sure what your point is there, though I have no objection to you calling her a puppet.

What don't you think gender has much to do with? Is it the fact that we haven't come close to electing a woman as president, or the fact that those other countries have?
Acacia
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
March 02, 2006 07:08PM
BTW, I really don't have much insight on this subject myself. Just wondering about it, especially now. I'd like to hear people's ideas though.
The man
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
March 02, 2006 07:13PM
Surely, Maggie Thatcher was not "a woman of colour", Jah Bill!

Observer
jb welda
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
March 02, 2006 07:58PM
what i mean acacia is that just because someone is of a certain gender (or color for that matter) doesnt and shouldnt mean that s/he will do things you agree with or will be any better than anyone else. the case in point i made was ms rice who as you point out isnt the pres but she is certainly in a position of more power than most any other woman in the usa is or has been (might be wrong about that) but look what thats done for us...not much that i can see.

in fact it might just be that next election we see hillary clinton (who i would vote for) vs ms rice (who i think is a vampire of the worst sort) squaring off for either pres or vice pres. kind of a left field thing to think republicans would nominate a woman as their canidate but the way things are going she is the one least tainted so far by W's bs...though she is in the middle of it she seems to be leaving room for the old plausible deniability so necessary for someone on a sinking ship of state.

ps to observer: please stop making connections you know well i dont mean.

one love
jah bill
Acacia
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
March 02, 2006 08:38PM
"what i mean acacia is that just because someone is of a certain gender (or color for that matter) doesnt and shouldnt mean that s/he will do things you agree with or will be any better than anyone else."

Agreed. That isn't what I was suggesting, though I do see your point now. Just wondering why it is that women so far haven't even come into consideration for the presidency. Maybe a better question to ask would have been: why haven't women run for president in this country? Your post reminds me of a time as a kid when I asked my (liberal feminist) mother if she would vote for a black woman republican for president and she said absolutely not. LOL smiling smiley

I'm sure there are plenty of variables that I haven't realized when thinking about what I see as an ironic situation, but I was hoping people here might point them out. We do have a TV show about a woman president. I mean, I love Geena Davis and all, but it seems quite pathetic that we have to resort to fantasizing about it on TV, meanwhile our real president is a corrupt liar with below-average intelligence. And here's a quote from the man himself that pretty well sums up the voting public in this country: "Fool me once, shame on.... shame on you. Fool me twice.... you can't get fooled again."

!
baykay
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
March 02, 2006 10:45PM
just wanted to point out that dominica elected the first female head of state in the caribbean, eugenia charles, in 1980.
but she certainly wasn't necessarily anymore progressive or positive than her male counterparts, and grenadians have legitimate reason to think she was more damning if anything.
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
March 03, 2006 12:32AM
Acacia asks: Are we still 50 years away, same as we were 50 years ago? When will we finally see it too?

Well, right now I think Hillary Clinton is way out in front to win her party's nomination for the 2008 election.

And, if the war and scandals continue, the Repugs will have a hard time finding a candidate that can beat her.

So, the answer is: Maybe 2008.
Acacia
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
March 03, 2006 12:36AM
Yeah, I wonder...

Nice talking to you guys again.
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
March 03, 2006 07:24AM
>j.b. welda:
>in fact it might just be that next election we see hillary clinton (who i would vote for) vs ms rice >(who i think is a vampire of the worst sort) squaring off for either pres or vice pres.

Bill Maher: "The Democratics and Republicans are identical cousins both played by Patty Duke."
Condelezza may be a scary vampire but Illary Clinton makes me shudder only slighty less. Clintons are the king and queen of Triangulation ("How can I get elected."winking smiley As long as the Dem's in Congress refused to stand up to our war mongering president and allow the Rep's to trample the constitution then no way a Clinton gets my support. She supports this mess. She can't win anyway. She got name recognition but the negatives are just too strong. Both people like me that have been holding my nose and votiong against Republicans won't vote for her, i.e., her support on the left is very weak. Independents will not swing her way if the Rep.s put up McCain. Only if Rep.s implode and nominate Jeb Bush or Bill Frist would Clinton have any chance. Dem's are so desparate have no doubt they would look for supposed star like Hillary to nominate cause they always tell the left to kiss off at nomination time.
Re: Jamaica gets new Prime Minister
March 03, 2006 08:06AM
Quoting Jah Bill:
"im not so sure that gender has much to do with it. look at condaleeza rice, now there is a woman of color...who also happens to be the biggest puppet we have seen in a long time".

"and then there was maggie thatcher".

Nice one Bill, if only there were karma points to award on this board! winking smiley

Doesn't Condoleezza tell Dubya everything he knows (i.e. not all that much) about t'ings a foreign?

Quoting Malcolm)
"Condelezza may be a scary vampire but Illary Clinton makes me shudder only slighty less. Clintons are the king and queen of Triangulation ("How can I get elected."winking smiley".

More karma!

______________________________________________________________

Published on Monday, November 11, 2002 by the San Francisco Chronicle
Dems Have Only Themselves To Blame
by Harley Sorensen


A date which ought to live in infamy for the Democratic Party is Jan. 24, 1992. That's the day Rickey Ray Rector was executed in Arkansas while Gov. Bill Clinton stood by and did nothing.

On that day in Arkansas, the Democratic Party also died. Its body is still with us, to be sure, but its heart and soul died 10 years ago.

Rickey Ray Rector, for those who would like to forget, shot and killed police officer Bob Martin in Conway, Ark., in 1981. After firing on Martin, Rector shot himself in the head. He botched the job, succeeding only in turning himself into an idiot.

His brain was so wrecked that before going to the execution chamber, Rector saved part of his last meal "for later."

Bill Clinton was running for president in 1992 when Rector was put to death. Clinton ran as a Democrat. In those days, only 10 years ago, most Democrats opposed capital punishment. It is safe to say that nearly all Democrats then were opposed to executing retarded people, no matter how severe their crimes.

But Clinton remembered the downfall of one Michael Dukakis four years earlier. Dukakis, the Democratic governor of Massachusetts, saw his presidential aspirations go up in smoke partly because he was perceived to be soft on crime.

In politician-speak, and particularly Republican-speak, any public official who doesn't have a brutish attitude toward society's losers is soft on crime. In Dukakis' case, rapist-murderer Willie Horton was rather stupidly furloughed from a Massachusetts prison, only to escape to Maryland to rape again. He was caught and quickly became a political liability to Dukakis, who was castigated in the 1988 Democrat primary by one Albert Gore Jr., another failed presidential aspirant of recent fame.

Willie Horton went on to become a legend in dirty politics when the friends of George H.W. Bush used him in campaign ads against Dukakis. As you'll recall, the tactic was successful, so King George I had the opportunity over the next four years to wreck the American economy, a job his son is now seeking to finish while conquering the world in his spare time.

In any case, Bill Clinton was resolved in 1992 not to face a "soft on crime" rap, so -- although he had it within his power to grant executive clemency -- he stood by and did nothing while an idiot was deliberately put to death in his state.

Clinton's success as a politician was not lost on other Democratic hopefuls, nor on Democratic voters, so they followed his lead in abandoning all liberal principles in favor of expediency.

Tired of losing to criminals like Richard Nixon and Spiro Agnew, or amiable clowns like Ronald Reagan, or ex-CIA chiefs like George H.W. Bush, the Democrats decided that the only way to beat 'em was to join 'em.

So they did. In 1999, when Bill Clinton sent our frighteningly eager military machine off to ravish Yugoslavia, nary a discouraging word was heard from the Democrats. A few months earlier, ironically, Serbs in Belgrade had met and shared memories with a few of the hundreds of shot-down American airmen they had rescued during World War II.

There is no word on whether our old Serb friends survived the 1999 bombings, but best estimates are that 3,000 Yugoslav civilians did not.

And the Democrats, not wanting to appear soft on tyrants, cheered Clinton's war, which was billed as "a just war."

(They got it wrong. It wasn't a just war; it was just a war.)

Part of the reason Clinton was so roundly hated by conservatives was his knack for stealing all their issues. He was so "hard" on crime that he appeared regularly in photo ops with uniformed officers behind him as he proposed or signed legislation narrowing civil liberties or expanding federal punishments.

Clinton didn't make up stories about ungrateful welfare recipients the way Reagan did, but he did propose, as a candidate, that anyone deemed capable of working be kicked off welfare after two years.

(Most liberals wouldn't object to that if it included the provisos that living-wage jobs be available and the hapless welfare recipients be trained to fill them.)

In short, many of Clinton's views and policies were just a little to the right of those once espoused by Barry Goldwater, who in his day was considered a right-wing extremist. Now, he'd be a middle-of-the-roader.

So, in this election season, which ended last Tuesday with a magnificent victory for the forces of darkness and a solid defeat for the Democrats, the Democrats presented themselves as . . . nothing.

Instead of presenting a vision for the future, their strongest selling point was that they were not as bad as the Republicans. In California, that worked. Even though the Democratic candidate for governor was an abomination, the Republican seemed worse, a man determined to lead us back into the Dark Ages, if we were dumb enough to elect him.

But California was the exception, and elsewhere in the country the Democrats came across as unconvincing mini-conservatives.

They deserved to lose. They didn't offer a choice. So they were defined by their opponents, who zeroed in on the excesses of liberalism. The candidates themselves rarely made a case for the finer points of liberalism.

This week, as the Democrats lick their wounds and try to regroup, it seems they'll be trying to figure out how to be even more like their Republican conquerors.

This does not bode well for the republic. And, if you like, you can blame Clinton for it.
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